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October 2013

 

President's Messages:
June 2014

January 2014

October 2013

May 2013

January 2013

October 2012

May 2012

January 2012

September 2011

 

      Message from the Editor: Advances in Cognitive

Therapy

    Newsletter Editor

Simon A. Rego, PsyD, ABPP, ACT

 

October, 2013

 
 

Welcome to the Advances in Cognitive Therapy, a joint publication of the International Association of Cognitive Psychotherapy (IACP) and the Academy of Cognitive Therapy (ACT).  Published three times per year (February, June, and October), Advances in Cognitive Therapy focuses on clinical issues, research updates, conference and training information, and summaries of CBT-related activities around the world. In addition to the science and practice of cognitive behavioral therapy are various other featured articles. For example, in each newsletter an author from a different part of the world writes an article on CBT in his or her country. Since June, 2010, we have covered CBT in South Africa, Finland, Turkey, Canada, Sweden, Iran, Greece, and Brazil. Every couple of issues I also ask a notable cognitive therapist/researcher in the field to write about his or her influences (a column called, “Standing on the Shoulders of Giants”). These giants write about their influences in training (e.g., who impacted their thinking? What were some of the people in the field who influenced their approach to CBT?). Thus far, we have featured Drs. Art Nezu, David M. Clark, Christopher Fairburn, and Philip Kendall. Periodically, I also have devoted specific newsletter issues to a particular theme or topic. Special issues have focused on homework in cognitive therapy, dealing with resistance and difficult cases in cognitive therapy, and CBT for anxiety.

Submissions to Advances in Cognitive Therapy are accepted on an ongoing basis. The deadlines for submission are January 15th, May 15th and September 15th. We are particularly interested in submissions from practitioners and researchers outside of the United States of America. Submissions should be 350-700 words and sent in Word format with no more than five references (using APA format).

In addition, if you have ideas for how to improve this newsletter or topics that you think would be worth focusing on, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Send submissions or ideas to:

Dr. Simon A. Rego

srego@montefiore.org

Rego

 

 

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June 2014

President's Message: June 2014
McGinn
Other issues:
January 2014

October 2013

May 2013

January 2013

October 2012

May 2012

January 2012

      President's Message

    IACP Presidential Column

Advances in Cognitive Therapy

Lata K. McGinn, PhD

June 2014
 

As my three-year term as president of IACP draws to a close, it is inevitable that I reflect back on the last three years. I began my term as president at the 7th International Congress of Cognitive Psychotherapy (ICCP), chaired by IACP board member Mehmet Sungur in Istanbul, Turkey in 2011. I will end my term in June, 2014 at the closing ceremonies of the 8th International Congress of Cognitive Psychotherapy (ICCP), chaired by Wing Wong in Hong Kong. Although the global economy continues to be sluggish, a lot has changed in the world since 2011. The construction of the freedom tower was finally completed in my hometown in New York City, social media has changed our lives immeasurably both in good ways and bad, and the arctic sea melt has increased appreciably, leading to severe climactic changes in the world.

Our field has witnessed many changes as well. There are now close to 300 meta-analyses on CBT demonstrating that CBT is effective for a wide range of psychological problems and disorders. Additionally, Eastern philosophy has overwhelmingly influenced the latest advances in cognitive behavioral approaches. Constructs such as mindfulness, dialectical thinking, and acceptance are no longer waves that ebb and flow but are steady streams that influence how cognitive behavioral therapists approach treatment. Emerging research also offers new insights on the impact of therapists, therapy processes, and clients’ sociocultural and demographic factors on treatment, although research in these areas still lags behind technique-based approaches.

 Broader changes have also transpired over the last three years. Despite its waning influence over disease classification and treatment, the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual was published in 2013 amidst much fanfare and criticism. Although the codes are essentially the same, the International Classification of Diseases continues to exert a far greater influence across the globe than the DSM, and will also be officially used for billing purposes in the US by the end of 2014. More importantly, the year 2013 witnessed the launch of an alternative disease classification for purposes of research. Established by the National Institute of Mental Health in the US, the Research Domain Criteria (R-DoC) are intended to classify psychopathology based on dimensions of observable behavior and neurobiological measures rather than on categorical dimensions based on clinical observation and self-reported symptoms. The R-DoC project intends to draw on latest research across genomics, neuroscience, and behavioral science, and hopes to inform better approaches for clinical diagnosis and treatment in the future.

 The International Association of Cognitive Psychotherapy (IACP) has also undergone many changes since I began my term as president. Not least of all, IACP received a facelift as we successfully developed and launched our new logo and website, and our journal’s new electronic management portal. As president, my  goals were to increase IACP’s presence throughout the world and to disseminate CBT, particularly in regions of the world where CBT is under-represented. Our initiatives to offer a discounted membership rate for economically disadvantaged regions, and to offer free online training for our members were met with success. We now have over 40 countries represented in our membership and we have launched free training initiatives for our members. 

Under the direction of Henrik Tingleff, chair of IACP’s International Training Committee, IACP launched a speaker’s bureau and a monthly video newsletter for our members. Under John Riskind’s editorship, the quality and the impact factor of our scientific peer-reviewed journal, the International Journal of Cognitive Therapy, has climbed over the last three years. 

(continued)

David Dozois transformed our newsletter published jointly with the Academy of Cognitive Therapy, and has now placed it in the skillful hands of Simon Rego, who continues to offer excellent columns for our readers. With Lynn McFarr at the helm of our Public Domain Committee, IACP now has 2,354 members on our Facebook page and has a presence on twitter. Under Frank Dattilio’s direction and guidance, IACP successfully launched the International Delegate Program - we now have delegates from 25 countries, with more delegates being appointed each year. My sincere thanks go to Sharon Clevenger and Laura Stone for their able management of IACP operations, I wish them well as they move on from their roles. I also want to thank past-president Keith Dobson for his invaluable contributions to IACP as he leaves the board at the end of June after nine years of service

By the time you read this column, we will be on our way to Hong Kong to participate in the 8th International Congress of Psychotherapy, where conference attendees will learn about the latest advances in CBT across the globe and mingle with each other. I want to extend my gratitude to Wing Wong and his extraordinary team for hosting our congress. It has been a pleasure working with him. I also want to thank Scientific Program Chair, Ron Rapee, and the scientific advisory team for putting together an excellent program at the Congress. It is my hope that over time every country will be represented within our membership and delegate program, and that IACP will continue to disseminate CBT to all its members. My goal is to build a truly inclusive world CBT organization that increases mutual and respectful understanding and dialogue between communities throughout the world.

IACP’s mission, to address the burden of mental illness by facilitating the growth of CBT as a scientific discipline and professional activity, is an important one. Although the R-DoC project includes behavioral sciences in its mandate, its clear emphasis is on using advances in genetics and neural basis of mental illness to inform classification and treatment. Despite the overabundance of research demonstrating efficacy of cognitive behavioral approaches, the influence of behavioral scientists in determining research funding and policy is marginal. As research funding begins to determine what we study as behavioral scientists, our field faces new and unforeseen challenges. Behavioral scientists and clinicians now have a clear mandate and need to work together to ensure that behavioral sciences are recognized, funded, and that advances in behavioral science are utilized to inform classification systems and treatment approaches.  Organizations like IACP have a responsibility to ensure that behavioral sciences have a voice in the emerging dialogue on alternative systems to understand and treat mental illness.

I want to thank IACP members and the board for giving me the opportunity to serve as president. I am honored to have led IACP over the past three years. As incoming past-president, I look forward to working with you on our new initiatives to potentially develop closer collaborations with the Academy of Cognitive Therapy, to build our new organizational membership category, and to launch further clinical training and research initiatives. I also look forward to seeing you at the 9th ICCP conference in Cluj-Napoca, Romania in 2017. I am delighted to pass the gavel and to extend a warm welcome to Stefan Hofmann, the incoming president of IACP.

 Sincerely,

Lata K. McGinn, PhD

President, IACP

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January 2014

President's Message: January 2014
McGinn
Other issues:
June 2014

October 2013

May 2013

January 2013

October 2012

May 2012

January 2012

      President's Message

    IACP Presidential Column

Advances in Cognitive Therapy

Lata K. McGinn, PhD

 

January, 2014

 

Hong Kong is getting ready to host the first international CBT conference in the East between June 24-27th, 2014. The Chinese Association of CBT (CACBT) is organizing the congress, and IACP is honored to be the host organization for this global, historic event. Dr. Wing Wong, President and Chair of the 8th International Congress of Cognitive Psychotherapy (ICCP), co-chair Dr. Calais Chan, and the rest of the local organizing and the China organizing committee are working tirelessly to organize a world-class event that everyone will remember. Scientific Program Chair Dr. Ron Rapee, an eminent scientist and professor at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia, and the rest of the scientific committee, have put together world-renowned keynote speakers, pre-congress and in-congress workshops, and master clinician seminars. The scientific program also offers cutting edge presentations in the form of open papers, symposia, posters, and clinical roundtables. Speakers will be discussing emerging frontiers in the treatment of depression, bipolar disorder, insomnia, personality disorders, psychoses, social anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, perfectionism, sexual dysfunction, emotional dysregulation, and more. Attendees will also learn innovative approaches for working with adults, children, couples, and families, and will also learn how to engage clients in homework, and train the next generation of CBT therapists.

Strategically positioned in the central hub of South East Asia, Hong Kong is a visitor’s paradise. It is safe, friendly, well organized, and offers a dizzying array of both ancient and modern sights for tourists to explore. Hong Kong is also a shopper's paradise, from its glitzy malls to its traditional street markets. Top sights include Victoria Peak, the Man Mo temple, the Giant Buddha at Lantau Island, the night market at Temple Street, the Tian Tan Buddha atop the monastery, the Tsim Sha Tsui promenade on Hong Kong Island, and my personal favorite, the Tang Dynasty Nan Lian Garden in Kowloon. Hong Kong is also a foodie haven and offers culinary splendors for tourists on any budget. Visitors looking to make day trips from Hong Kong can also visit famed destinations such as Macau Island and Canton. In addition to visiting Mainland China, International travelers looking to explore the surrounding area will find that Hong Kong is also within easy reach of other the major Asian countries such as Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, India, Sri Lanka, and Indonesia.

 

 

(continued)

The premier Hong Kong Convention & Exhibition Centre is the conference venue for ICCP, 2014. Built along the Victoria Harbour, it is linked by covered walkways to nearby hotels and offers spectacular views of the harbour. The registration fees include admission to general scientific sessions (except for pre-congress and in-congress workshops), the opening ceremony and welcome reception on June, 24th 2014, a selection of coffee breaks and working lunches, and more. IACP members pay the lowest registration fees at the conference. If you are not yet a member, please visit www.the-iacp.org to join so that you can receive all membership benefits, including the 10% conference registration discount.

For those interested, the organizing committee has also planned optional social programs and tours for an additional cost. Planned excursions include the Peak and Stanley Market tour, the village of Ngong Ping and Lantau Island tour, the Geopark walking tour with a seafood lunch, the Lamma Island tour with a seafood dinner, the guided market tour and dim sum cooking classes, one-day Macau Tour with lunch and more. Other planned social programs, such as the dinner cruises on Victoria Harbour, and dinner at the Jumbo Floating restaurant, allow attendees and speakers to relax and socialize with each other. Finally, visitors can also elect to join the variety of organized pre or post congress tours to neighboring regions. Please visit www.iccp2014.com to learn more about the conference program and planned activities.

As president of IACP, I hope that you enjoy every moment of ICCP 2014, and that you will either come early or stay longer, to enjoy the people, culture and sites of Hong Kong.

 Sincerely,

Lata K. McGinn, PhD

President, IACP

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Advances Logo

 

October 2013

President's Message: October 2013
McGinn
Other issues:
May 2013

January 2013

October 2012

May 2012

January 2011

September 2011

      President's Message

    IACP Presidential Column

Advances in Cognitive Therapy

Lata K. McGinn, PhD

 

October, 2013

 

 

On behalf of the International Association for Cognitive Psychotherapy (IACP), I am pleased to invite you to our next triennial convention in 2014 in Hong Kong.  The call for papers and the deadline for submissions (December 6th, 2013) have been announced.  You can learn more about the conference and the sights to see in and around Hong Kong by going to our conference page (www.the-iacp.com/conferences) or by going directly to the conference website (www.iccp2014.com).  IACP membergs get the lowest discount on registration fees.  I hope you will take advantage of this offer.                                                                                                                                                                              
The International Congress of Cognitive Psychotherapy (ICCP) is the official meeting of the International Association for Cognitive Psychotherapy (IACP) and is held every three years.  It brings together world leaders in clinical research and practice of CBT as well as researchers, therapists, and students with an interest in cognitive behavior therapy.  The 8th International Congress of Cognitive Psychotherapy will be held between June 24-27th 2014 in Hong Kong, China and will offer you the best of recent developments in cognitive and behavioral therapies in a unique international setting.  Given its geographical location and its cultural heritage, Hong Kong is truly a gateway between the East and West and provides a perfect context for the expansion of knowledge, interest and practice of cognitive behavior therapy.  This multicultural exchange promises to make ICCP 2014 especially stimulating and influential.

 

 

 

Hong Kong also offers you its expansive skyline, rolling hills
and mountains, coastal landscapes, sea views and distinctive
outlying islands.  Hong Kong Island lies to the south of the
Victoria harbor, the Kowloon Peninsula forms its northern
shores and to the north of Kowloon lies the New Territories,
which stretch all the way to Mainland China.  
Hong Kong is
also a shopper's paradise, from its glitzy malls to its traditio
nal street markets.  The Hong Kong Convention & Exhibition Center (HKCEC), a truly state-of-the-art venue located on the banks of the Victoria Harbor, offers you a stunning view of Hong Kong's skyline, and access to the best of what the city has to offer.  President of ICCP 2014 Dr. Chee Wing Wong, along with co-chair Dr. Calais Chan and the rest of the team from the Chinese Association of Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CACBT) are organizing a truly landmark conference.  Dr. Ron Rapee, Professor of Psychology at Macquarie University and a world-renowned researcher in anxiety disorders is the scientific program chair of ICCP, 2014. Dr. Rapee and the scientific advisory committee are putting together a cutting edge scientific program with world-renowned speakers and the best of the next generation of clinical research being conducted on cognitive behavioral therapies.  I hope that you enjoy every moment of ICCP 2014, and that you will either come early or stay longer, to enjoy the people, culture and sites of Hong Kong.

 Sincerely,

Lata K. McGinn, PhD

President, IACP

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Advances Logo

 

May 2013

President's Message: May 2013
McGinn
Other issues:

October 2013

January 2013

October 2012

May 2012

January 2012

September 2011

      President's Message

      IACP Presidential Column

Advances in Cognitive Therapy

Lata K. McGinn, PhD

 

May, 2013

 

Research suggests that lifetime diagnoses of Social Anxiety Disorder are much more common in developed countries than in developing countries although the prevalence of social fears appear to be comparable across both regions (McGinn & Newman, 2013). Southeast Asian cultures generally report the lowest rates while US samples show some of the highest rates of SAD. What is even more noteworthy is that the prevalence in the US consistently seems to be higher than the prevalence observed in European countries. The national comorbidity replication study showed that SAD was the most common anxiety disorder and the fourth most common psychiatric disorder in the United States.


At first blush this seems inexplicable. How could a “nation of extroverts” have the some of the highest rates of social anxiety disorder? Of course, some of these discrepant rates may result from differences in language or culture, the measures used to assess social anxiety disorder, the number and type of social situations assessed and so on. For example, it is possible that symptoms in the East are captured by culturally syntonic expressions such as Taijin kyofusho (a fear of causing offense to others). 

However, it is also conceivable that social anxiety disorder is as high in the US precisely because the US prizes itself on being a nation of extroverts. It may be the case that there is a far lower tolerance for social inhibition in the US than elsewhere in the world. In her recent book “Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can’t Stop Talking, Susan Cain documents the rise of the extrovert ideal in the US beginning in the twentieth century (Cain, 2012). She notes that one out of every three people in the US is introverted yet what is valued is the “omnipresent belief that the ideal self is gregarious, alpha, and comfortable in the spotlight.” Introversion, she says, along with shyness and other related traits, has become a “second-class” personality trait, “somewhere between a disappointment and a pathology.”

Although social anxiety is a real disorder and exists in every culture, it is also possible that it is more readily diagnosed in the US - not only because clinicians are more likely to pathologize introversion, shyness and so on but because many introverts and shy individuals truly suffer more impairment in functioning as they attempt to fit into a country that values a more expansive temperament.  

Was it always this way? Cain argues not. She notes that at the turn of the twentieth century, America shifted from a “Culture of Character” where the ideal self was “serious, disciplined, and honorable” to a “Culture of Personality” where your personality and how you were perceived by others in public was more vital than how you behaved in private. It is hardly surprising to learn then that there has been a corresponding increase in the rates of social anxiety disorder in the US over time. Research shows that younger cohorts in the US have higher rates of social anxiety disorder as compared to older cohorts.

(continued)
By contrast, introverted behaviors are highly prized in cultures that report the lowest rates of social anxiety disorder. Asian proverbs extoll the virtues of discretion over eloquence and recommend that thinking before speaking is far better than speaking all that you think. Averting your gaze is considered to be polite and respectful. A Chinese friend once told me that that it is considered far better in the Chinese culture to hide one’s “light” under a basket rather than flash a glaring spotlight onto the world. His Chinese name means “to conceal or to hide one’s talents.” Being introverted, shy, and reticent are seen as strengths rather than weaknesses - a hidden light is celebrated and considered worth the ultimate discovery.


Although much has been written on the fact the Social anxiety disorder should be defined in relation to the reference group, it is important to also consider that sometimes what is defined as dysfunctional in a particular reference group may itself need to be redefined. It is possible that in moving to a culture of personality, we have lost our appreciation for people who prefer to keep their light hidden under a basket.

 

Cain, S. (2012). Quiet: the power of introverts in a world that can't stop talking. New York, NY: Crown Publishing.

 McGinn, L.K. & Newman, M. (2013). Status Update on Social Anxiety Disorder. International Journal of Cognitive Therapy, 6 (2), 88-113.

 

 

 

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January 2013

President's Message: January 2013
McGinn
Other issues:
October 2013

May 2013

October 2012

May 2012

January 2012

September 2011

        President's Message

IACP Presidential Column

Advances in Cognitive Therapy

Lata K. McGinn, PhD

 

January, 2013

 

As I reflect on the year that just passed, I am struck by the series of tragic events that recently occurred in my hometown. Autumn in the New York tri-state area was admittedly unusual. The devastating story of a nanny who killed two small children under her care gripped New Yorkers who collectively mourned for the family whose lives were senselessly destroyed. Hurricane Sandy created severe devastation across North Eastern United States, particularly in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Maryland, leading many to lose their homes and their livelihood. And most recently, a gunman shot 26 people in Newtown, Connecticut, most of whom were children between the ages of six and seven, making this the second deadliest shooting in US history.  People grieved across the globe and parents everywhere held their own children closer knowing that this could have happened to one of their own. 

 

Of course, the US was not alone in experiencing disastrous events last year. Both the Philippines and Russia experienced massive flooding after heavy rains hit their regions this past summer.  Northern Italy and Indonesia both experienced earthquakes of significant magnitude in the spring of 2012, leaving significant destruction in their wake. A plane crash in Lagos, Nigeria killed over 150 people and a fire set by an inmate killed over 300 people at a prison in Honduras.   

 

Together, these stories underscore the salience of mental health issues in our lives, both the effects of untreated psychological problems and the range of psychological problems that may arise following a traumatic event. Fortunately, research shows that that the majority of people exposed to a traumatic will have a normal reaction that will gradually reduce over time. Although the impact of a trauma varies greatly depending upon the type of trauma experienced and the individual who experiences it, evidence suggests that in most cases, resilience is the most common outcome to trauma. Even among those who develop PTSD, symptoms generally tend to subside over time. Several risk factors, including gender, age, prior psychiatric illness, degree of exposure, a loss of resources, and specific maladaptive cognitive styles increase the likelihood that an individual will develop post-traumatic reactions.

 “Psychological first-aid” is the initial intervention of choice to facilitate normal recovery in individuals who have experienced a traumatic event. Offering empathic assistance, normalizing survivor reactions in the context of optimistic messages about recovery, and increasing the individual’s safety, physical and psychological comfort may be all that are needed in the immediate aftermath of a trauma. Other critical elements include ensuring the availability of informal and formal support networks. Therapeutic efforts aimed at eliciting details of experiences and losses from survivors are discouraged and instead, survivors are helped to turn to family and friends for support and are encouraged to engage in some form of meaningful activity.

 

 

 

(continued)

Although research shows that symptoms decrease naturally even among individuals who develop post-traumatic reactions, those whose distress levels remain high after two or three weeks following a trauma may be referred for treatment. However, clinicians must weigh the necessity of intervening early for at-risk individuals against the danger of intervening needlessly in cases where individuals may recover on their own, with enough time and support. Emerging research suggests that brief, cognitive-behavioral prevention programs provided within two weeks to a month following a traumatic experience may be effective in preventing the development of chronic and severe PTSD symptoms in at-risk individuals. Critical ingredients appear to be exposure and cognitive restructuring along with education about common trauma symptoms.

Finally, a range of effective treatments is available for those who develop full-blown symptoms. Research suggests that symptoms will persist in both intensity and duration if symptoms have not remitted after approximately 12 months. Hence, targeted treatments are essential for individuals in need. Expert Consensus Guidelines recommend cognitive behavioral therapy and anti-depressant medications as effective treatments for PTSD. Cognitive behavioral strategies are recommended over medications in milder cases for all populations whereas CBT or medications, or a combination of the two, are offered as equally viable alternative in more severe or chronic cases. Substantial research points to the efficacy of CBT as a first line treatment for individuals who develop PTSD. Exposure based strategies, emphasizing habituation to the memory of the event, and exposure to continued fear and avoidance of objectively safe events, appear to be the most effective. Cognitive therapy to restructure maladaptive cognitions that maintain a sense of current and future threat is also recommended.

While tragic events may be an inevitable part of our lives, our ability to address those exposed and to help prevent long-term consequences continues to improve each year. I look forward to further advances in our ability to help those whose lives are needlessly shattered. 

Sincerely,

Lata K. McGinn, PhD

President, IACP

 

Herbert, J. D., & Sageman, M. (2004).  “First do no harm:” Emerging guidelines for the treatment of posttraumatic reactions.  In G.M. Rosen (Ed.), Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Issues and Controversies. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons

McGinn, L. K. & Spindel, C. B. (2007). Disaster  Trauma. Cognitive Behavioral Strategies in Crisis Intervention. Eds. Dattilio & Freeman, A. NY: Guilford Press.

 

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October 2012

President's Message: October 2012
McGinn
Other issues:
October 2013

May 2013

January 2013

May 2012

January 2012

September 2011

       President's Message

IACP Presidential Column

Advances in Cognitive Therapy

Lata K. McGinn, PhD

 

October, 2012

 

It has been just over a year since I took over as president of the International Association of Cognitive Therapy (IACP). My mission over my three year tenure is to increase IACP’s global presence, disseminate CBT, particularly in regions of the world in which CBT is under-represented, and to increase mutual and respectful dialogue between CBT communities worldwide. The board and I have been hard at work over the last year to begin accomplishing these goals and I would like to share our efforts with you.

 

To ensure that IACP is truly poised to fulfill our mission, we have been working to make sure we are at the forefront of the modern digital age. We have spent the last year carefully designing a logo to reflect our new vision of IACP. I am proud to tell you that our new IACP logo is ready and will hopefully be launched by the time this column is published. Our website has also undergone many exciting changes over this past year. Our public domain committee, under the direction of IACP board member Lynn McFarr, has given us a consistent and regular presence on our website, facebook, listserv, twitter and other multi-media platforms. By doing so, we hope to facilitate a dialogue between IACP members worldwide and expand our dissemination efforts.

 

We also unveiled our International Delegate program last year. Under the leadership of board member Frank Dattilio, this program has been a tremendous success. We are proud to now have delegates from different parts of the world representing IACP to their country, and representing their country to our members. Through our conference in 2011, Board member Mehmet Sungur has also been working steadily to increase our presence in Turkey. It is my sincere hope that we will have at least one delegate from each country in the world before I leave office. IACP is committed to providing equal representation to all countries in the world and aims to improve our understanding of the cultural context of each member country.

Our membership office, chaired by Sharon Freeman Clevenger, launched our discounted membership program last year to facilitate our mission to serve developing countries. Initiated by past-president Keith Dobson, our discounted membership program now offers reduced fees to individuals who reside in economically disadvantaged countries. It is my sincere hope that this program will make IACP membership affordable to individuals in ever corner of the world.

 

 

(continued)

 

Henrik Tingleff, chair of IACP’s International Training Committee, has made great strides in increasing our on-line dissemination and training to members, especially in regions that have few resources. IACP inaugurated its speakers’ bureau last year to help make the services of leading experts more easily accessible and affordable to all IACP members. Using our redesigned website, our members are able to access posters and view keynote addresses from the IACP’s 2011 conference in Istanbul and also have the opportunity to watch brief personal interviews with experts around the world. Stay tuned for our exciting new member initiative, The IACP video monthly, which will provide quick tips to busy clinicians each month. 

Aiding us in our dissemination efforts, IACP’s International Journal of Cognitive Therapy (IJCT) continues to publish stellar peer-reviewed articles under the stewardship of its editor-in-chief John Riskind. David Dozois, editor of this wonderful newsletter co-published with the Academy of Cognitive Therapy, has also done a remarkable job in giving our members insightful and relevant articles on CBT. 

 

IACP’s membership is growing steadily and we look forward to our upcoming conference in June, 2014. Led by conference Chair, Wing Wong, and scientific program chair, Ron Rapee, the scientific advisory committee promises to give us a memorable, cutting-edge conference. Looking further ahead, President-elect, Stefan Hofmann and I look forward to receiving bids for our future conference in 2017.

 

I thank you for giving me the opportunity to lead IACP. I look forward to serving you over the next few years. 

Sincerely,

Lata K. McGinn, PhD

President, IACP

 

If you are an IACP member and have logged in, please click here to view the

current newsletters and other members-only content.

If you are not an IACP member, join today to obtain this and other benefits of membership!



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May 2012

President's Message: May 2012
McGinn
Other issues:
October 2013

May 2013

January 2013

October 2012

January 2012

September 2011

       President's Message

IACP Presidential Column

Advances in Cognitive Therapy

Lata K. McGinn, PhD

 

May, 2012

 

During my recent visit to Hong Kong to conduct a site visit for IACP’s upcoming conference in June 24-27, 2014, I saw and learned countless things. With Dr. Wing Wong and Bowie Chan as my esteemed guides, I visited some remarkable sights. The, heritage homes of ancestral dynasties, modern skyscrapers, The Peak, Repulse Bay, Stanley Market, the Jade Market, and many more, brought home with clarity that modern day Hong Kong is a true nexus between the East and the West. The beautifully landscaped classical Tang Dynasty Nan Lian Garden was breathtaking in its serenity and remains one of my most treasured spots in Hong Kong.

I learned that guests are treated with the utmost care and respect. Dr. Wing Wong and the Chinese Association of CBT (CACBT) organized a site visit that was a marvel of efficiency with no detail left unattended. The site visit ended with a glorious Chinese banquet to cement the relationship between CABCT and IACP.  I learned that the Chinese University of Hong Kong is one of the largest universities in the world.  I also learned that CBT is thriving in Hong Kong and China, and that it is the psychotherapeutic treatment of choice among the Chinese.  

 

The global burden of mental illness underscores importance of disseminating CBT throughout the world. The WHO World Mental Health (WMH) studies reveal that global lifetime DSM-IV disorder prevalence estimates combining anxiety, mood, externalizing, and substance use disorders range from 18.1-36.1% while the 12-month prevalence estimates range from 9.8-19.1%. Recent studies also show that mental illnesses are more prevalent in Hong Kong and mainland China than previously thought.

Although the vast majority of studies demonstrating the efficacy of CBT have been conducted on Western, Caucasian samples, research conducted so far suggests that CBT is effective with other populations, especially when it is adapted to the meet the needs of specific cultural groups. A majority of the research conducted in Hong Kong and mainland China demonstrates that CBT is effective in reducing symptoms and improving quality of life among Chinese populations.

 Although central elements of CBT such as the structure and problem-focus have been easily adopted, many cultural beliefs require adaptations to maximize benefits. For example, research suggests that Chinese may somatize psychological distress and have a greater degree of comfort addressing somatic symptoms in treatment, necessitating that identification of emotions include a focus on somatic sensations and not merely on subjective elements.  A sentence-stem approach may be needed when using socratic questioning to identify thoughts, in order to minimize the potential shame experienced by patients at being unable to provide the “correct” answer during the guided discovery process. 

(continued)

Other cultural adaptations have included using culturally appropriate expressions, emphasizing behavioral elements, and providing a greater focus on interpersonal and family relationships. A culturally adapted form of cognitive therapy also integrates elements of Taoist philosophy, such as learning how to be content and knowing how to let go, to better fit the beliefs and values of the Chinese culture. In turn, such adaptations offer the West a way of incorporating newer elements into traditional CBT. Eastern principles have long since become infused in newer forms of CBT. By disseminating CBT throughout the world, we find that cognitive behavioral therapies become further enriched.

Chen, S.W. & Davenport, D.S. (2005). Cognitive-behavioral therapy with Chinese American clients: Cautions and modifications. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 42(1), 101-110.

Chen, C., Wong, J, Lee, Nancy, Chan-Ho, M., Lau, J. & Fung, M. (1993). The Shatin Community Mental Health Survey in Hong Kong. Archives of General Psychiatry. 50(2),125-133.

The WHO World Mental Health Survey Consortium. Prevalence, severity, and unmet needs for treatment of Mental Disorders in the World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys, JAMA, 2004:291-2581-90.

Wong, D.F. (2008). Cognitive behavioral treatment groups for people with chronic depression in Hong Kong: A randomized wait-list control design. Depression and Anxiety, 25, 142-148.

Wong, D.F., Sun, S.Y., Tse, J., & Wong, F. (2002). Evaluating the outcomes of a cognitive-behavioral group intervention model for persons at risk of developing mental health problems in Hong Kong: A pretest-posttest study. Research on Social Work Practice, 12(4), 534-545.

Zhang, Y., Young, D., Lee, S., Li, L., Zhang, H., Xiao, Z., Hao, W., Feng, Y., Zhou, H., & Chang, D.F. (2002). Chinese Taoist cognitive psychotherapy in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder in contemporary China. Transcultural Psychiatry, 39(1), 115-129.

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January 2012

President's Message: January 2012
McGinn
Other issues:
October 2013

May 2013

January 2013

October 2012

May 2012

September 2011

      President's Message

IACP Presidential Column

Advances in Cognitive Therapy

Lata K. McGinn, PhD

 

January, 2012

 

At the start of the New Year, I began reading ‘s Stanley Lombardo’s translation of Homer’s Iliad and was struck by the universal themes it tackles.  Honor, pride, rage, fear, guilt and grief are central to the story and lead to an unceasing war between the Greeks and the Trojans. Helen has left her husband, King Menelaus, for Paris, a Trojan prince and the Greeks are compelled to fight in the war as their king’s honor is at stake. Achilles refuses to fight in the war because his pride is injured at the hands of the Greek leader, Agamemnon. In doing so, Achilles succeeds in dishonoring Agamemnon who cannot win the war without him, but does so at a great cost to his fellow Achaeans. Helen is struck with shame and guilt at the consequences of her decision to leave her husband and watches helplessly as her relatives are killed one by one. 

Not much has changed. We are all subject to unhelpful ways of thinking, fall victim to negative emotions, and behave in ways that may be designed to serve our emotions and not help the situation at hand. For some, this suffering is more pronounced and can lead to self-defeating thoughts and behaviors, which in turn, lead to endless misery and unhappiness.

As cognitive behavior therapists, we strive to help people for whom suffering is the only experience they know. As we create a global network of cognitive behavior therapists, study what makes us different across cultures, and learn ways to adapt our understanding and treatment of suffering, it seems that we must not forget that at our essence, humans celebrate and struggle with many of the same things. 

It is an exciting time for our field as the worldwide community of cognitive behavior therapists continues to grow. Forty-six countries are represented in the International Association of Cognitive Psychotherapy and it is our hope that in the next few years, we will have members from each country in the world. Founded by the father of cognitive therapy, Dr. Aaron T. Beck, the International Association of Cognitive Psychotherapy (IACP) aims to bring together CBT communities and disseminate CBT throughout the world. We are particularly interested in increasing our reach to regions in which CBT is under-represented, particularly in countries that are economically disadvantaged. Our board is energized to work toward this goal and I hope our members will join us in working to fulfilling our mission.  

 

(continued)

I am delighted to let you know that Dr. Stefan Hofmann is now president-elect of IACP and will assume his term when I complete my presidency in June, 2014.  It also gives me pleasure to let you know that Dr. Ron Rapee has agreed to serve as the scientific program chair for our conference in 2014. By the time this column is published, Keith Dobson and I will have completed our visit to Hong Kong to conduct a site visit for our upcoming conference in 2014. Dr. Wing Wong, Chairman of the Chinese Association of Cognitive and Behavioral Therapy (CACBT), who will be leading the organization of our 8th ICCP congress on behalf of CACBT, is planning a truly stellar conference for our delegates. I sincerely hope that you will attend. Please visit out website (www.the-iacp.com) so you can learn more about our upcoming conference.

I want to thank the rest of the board for all they do to make this organization a vibrant one and I am excited to be working alongside them over the next few years. Please join me in thanking Frank Dattilio, Keith Dobson, Sharon Freeman, Stefan Hofmann, Lynn McFarr, John Riskind, and Mehmet Sungur for their invaluable contributions to IACP.

Sincerely,


Lata K. McGinn, PhD

President, IACP

 

 

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September 2011

President's Message: September 2011
McGinn
Other issues:
October 2013

May 2013

January 2013

October 2012

May 2012

January 2012

      President's Message

    IACP Presidential Column

Advances in Cognitive Therapy

Lata K. McGinn, PhD

 

September, 2011

 

As the incoming president of IACP, I want to thank our outgoing president Keith Dobson for his service to IACP and his invaluable counsel and support as I start my term. I began my term at the end of IACP’s successful triennual conference (ICCP, 2011) held in Istanbul, Turkey between June 2nd-5th. Organized by our board member-at-large Mehmet Sungur, the conference was an overwhelming success. Delegates were treated to an unforgettable academic and cultural feast as we gained knowledge and discovered a city where the East and West come together in complete harmony. Conference attendees had the opportunity to meet and network with CBT therapists around the world and learn about the latest developments in CBT from our most eminent world leaders in CBT.  We thank Mehmet for inviting us to his homeland and treating us as family. IACP is immensely grateful to him for his tireless efforts in making our 2011 triennial conference a success.

Please visit our website (www.the-iacp.com) to see photos taken at the conference and stay tuned as we upload videos of key events at the conference and personal interviews conducted with speakers. Posters presented at the conference are also available as part of the Special Issue on-line now. Chaired by Stefania Borgo and Lucio Sibilia, the special issue can be downloaded from http://www.crpitalia.eu/psychomedeng.html (N.3 Year VI 2011). Key presentations at the conference will also be highlighted in a special series in an upcoming issue of IACP’s journal the International Journal of Cognitive Therapy (IJCT). Published by Guilford Press and edited by John Riskind, our journal offers members the opportunity to keep up with the latest developments in CBT.

 I served on a panel at the conference along with Keith Dobson and Stefan Hoffman where we discussed the future of CBT and the issues facing the growth of evidence-based treatments throughout the world. As Keith discussed in his last column, the scientific understanding and application of CBT must also take into account the sociocultural background and values of individuals practicing and receiving CBT. As an international organization, it is our mission to bring together CBT communities and disseminate CBT throughout the world. 

 

(continued)

As we look ahead, IACP hopes to work closely with members in different regions of the world to increase our understanding of the unique cultural context of member countries. We are gearing up to spread the reach of CBT in regions where CBT is under-represented. We now offer a discounted membership rate for individuals who reside in economically disadvantaged regions of the world and hope to disseminate CBT to members who do not have resources available within their country. We encourage current members to become more active in the IACP community and help us toward this goal.

Finally, on behalf of IACP, I am also pleased to invite you to become a delegate at our next triennual convention in 2014 in Hong Kong. I look forward to working closely with Wing Wong, Chairman of the Chinese Association of Cognitive and Behavioral Therapies, who will be leading the organization of our 8th ICCP congress on behalf of CACBT. The 2014 congress will offer you the best of recent developments in cognitive and behavioral therapies in a unique international setting. Hong Kong offers you its expansive skyline, rolling hills and mountains, coastal landscapes, sea views and distinctive outlying islands. Hong Kong is also a shopper’s paradise, from its glitzy malls to its traditional street markets. Come learn about its history as a colony of the British Empire, its resumption of sovereignty in 1997, and all about modern day Hong Kong. I hope that you enjoy every moment of ICCP 2014, and that you will either come early or stay longer, to enjoy the people, culture and sites of Hong Kong. Please visit out website (www.the-iacp.com) to so you can learn more about our upcoming conference.

I want to thank the IACP members for giving me the opportunity to serve IACP over the next three years and to the IACP board for their ongoing service to the organization. I look forward to serving you.

 Sincerely,

Lata K. McGinn, PhD

President, IACP

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